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PASSING THE BATON

Crime Reduction Toolkit

Engage ... Inform ... Progress

Covers and explores major aspects of the Police and the Use of Force, Rules of Engagement, Social Conduct and Human Right

AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL - USE OF FORCE

August 2015

INTRODUCTION “The means may be likened to a seed, the end to a tree; and there is just the same inviolable connection between the means and the end as there is between the seed and the tree. We reap exactly as we sow.” [M. K. Gandhi, Hind Swaraj. Chap. XVI] I. Background of these Guidelines In order to be able to fulfil their responsibilities of maintaining law, safety and public order and preventing and detecting crime, law enforcement officials are granted a number of powers, including the power to use force and firearms. Explanatory note: The term law enforcement official includes any security forces, including military forces, who exercise police powers, especially the power of arrest and detention. For reasons of readability, the term ‘police’ is sometimes used, however still in the broader sense to include other law enforcement personnel exercising police powers. See also: Commentary a) and b) to Art. 1 Code of Conduct for Law Enforcement Officials.

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TEN KEY PRINCIPLES GOVERNING THE USE OF FORCE BY THE POLICE SERVICE

HMIC (2011) The rules of engagement: A review of the August 2011 disorders, © Crown copyright.

This is your News Article. It’s a great place to share industry news, or publish relevant announcements about your company. Been in the1. Police officers owe a general duty to protect persons and property, to preserve order, to prevent the commission of offences and, where an offence has been committed, to take measures to bring the offender to justice;


2. Police officers may, consistent with this duty, use force in the exercise of particular statutory powers, for the prevention of crime or in effecting a lawful arrest. They may also do so in self defence or the defence of others, to stop or prevent an imminent breach of the peace, and to protect property; press recently? Let visitors know about it, and add a link to the original article or write-up.

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POLICE USE OF FORCE STATISTICS, ENGLAND AND WALES APRIL 2018 TO MARCH 2019

19 December 2019

The statistics in this release are Experimental Statistics and do not represent all use of force in the 43 Home Office funded police forces in England and Wales

From 1 April 2017, the National Police Chiefs’ Council (NPCC) introduced the requirement for all police forces in the UK to record data on police use of force. The purpose of this collection is to provide the public with more information on the different types of force used and the context in which this occurs. The statistics on police use of force within this release cover incidents in England and Wales between 1 April 2018 and 31 March 2019. Data was collected from the 43 Home Office funded police forces in England and Wales. These statistics are currently designated as ‘Experimental Statistics’ so their accuracy should be not be assumed. Experimental Statistics are published to involve users and stakeholders in their development and to improve quality at an early stage. It is important that users understand the limitations of these statistics. More information is available below, and in the User guide to 'Police use of force statistics, England and Wales'.

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CODE OF PRACTICE ON ARMED POLICING AND POLICE USE OF LESS LETHAL WEAPONS

January 2020

Code of Practice on Armed Policing and Police use of Less Lethal Weapons Presented to Parliament pursuant to Section 39A(5) of the Police Act 1996, as amended by Section 124 of the Anti-social Behaviour, Crime and Policing Act 2014

Purpose of the code 1.1.1 The purpose of this code is to: n set out the responsibilities of the chief officer in relation to armed policing and less lethal weapons (section 3) n set out the basic principles in relation to the selection, evaluation, approval, authorisation, acquisition and use of firearms, specialist munitions and less lethal weapons by police n set out the manner in which those principles are implemented within the police service n provide a statement on standards of competence, accreditation and operational practice relating to armed policing and less lethal weapons n ensure that observance of these principles, and the standards for implementation, results in a systematic programme of continuous development of police policy, practice and capability n promote compatibility of operating procedures for such weapons to support procedures for evaluation and maintaining standards of competence, and to support operations involving officers drawn from more than one force n foster the identification and promulgation of good practice, and encourage and support the continuing development and improvement of police responses to the requirement identified in the armed policing strategic threat and risk assessment (APSTRA), (refer to section 3.2).

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UNARMED SKILLS

HMIC (2011) The rules of engagement: A review of the August 2011 disorders, © Crown copyright.

Introduction Unarmed skills, together with communication, are the important basics of officer personal safety, which additionally support the use of issued or improvised equipment. This module contains elements of control, restraint, immobilisation, defence and offence, with which to direct subjects. It is limited to applications which are generally simple to learn and apply, and which are unlikely to deteriorate substantially under conditions of stress. Some skills are applicable to specific areas, while others are designed to be used tactically when spontaneity is desirable

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PRISON SERVICE ORDER 1600 - USE OF FORCE

January 12, 2023

INTRODUCTION 1.1. Prison Service Order 1600 is the Prison Service‟s policy covering the use of force. It details the circumstances in which force can be used and the framework for justifying the use of force. The Use of Force policy document covers not only Control and Restraint techniques but also de-escalation skills, personal safety techniques and the use of batons. 1.2. The Use of Force Training Manual (formerly Prison Service Order 1601) is used when training staff in the use of force, including Personal Safety and Control and Restraint techniques. The Training Manual is issued as a CD Rom to all Governors and local C&R instructors. 1.3. The Control and Restraint Advanced Manual (formerly Prison Service Order 1602) remains a restricted document. Access is limited to National C&R instructors and the Gold Command Suite. 1.4. Instructions relating to Special Accommodation and Mechanical Restraints can be found in PSO1700. Text contained within a shaded

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